Sunday, October 14, 2012

Heritage Tree Designated In Ocean Park

WE WERE CUTTING CAKE not trees in the Ocean Park community last Saturday in honor of a tree that stands tall in leafy splendor in front of an 87-year-old heritage home. It is an epic ode to nature along a quiet street.

The Common Horse Chestnut, thought to have been planted by local pioneer John Horner who built the historic shingle clad house in its shadow, was recently designated a heritage tree and celebrations were planned.

The magnificence of the tree is not easily captured with a camera. While a multitude of branches reach skyward like outstretched arms ...

inedible chestnuts fall to the ground in autumn and leave slippery conundrums for walkers passing by. Although best not planted by the sides of roads for this reason, the hardy tree is often seen lining streets in towns and cities throughout the world.

At a time when more trees are on the chopping block, it is reassuring to see some that are preserved and treasured. A gathering place for birds, an umbrella for shade in summer and a whistler of tunes when breezes blow, this tree holds a special place in the hearts of many in the neighborhood.

Isn't one special tree rooted in many childhood memories? I still remember fondly a towering Redwood with giant branches I loved to climb as a girl. It provided hours of fun and let me escape into fantasy realms. The tree helped my imagination grow and challenged me to see how high I could go.

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Copyright by Penelope Puddlisms

16 comments:

  1. Thank goodness they are finally starting to appreciate trees for the beauties they are.

    What a lovely tribute to the tree.

    Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

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  2. Nice to see a tree designated as heritage. Did you do a post on the house at one time?

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  3. Hi Stephanie, You might be thinking of the post I did on another heritage home called the Stewart Farmhouse at Elgin Park. Both places are in South Surrey. :)

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  4. I used to play "conkers" with horse chestnut seeds as a kid - do you have that game in your neck of the woods!

    Bees are under threat all over the world - hard to believe really.

    Stewart M - Australia

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  5. What an absolutely beautiful tree! I love that it is being treasured and thought you did really well showing its splendour in your photographs. You are right that childhood memories often involve a favourite tree. I remember my Mom talking about one outside her home in Newfoundland, and there were two elms, one on each side of our front sidewalk, that were a huge part of my growing up years. Lovely post, Penelope!

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  6. Wonderful shots and an interesting post. I also love the shots on your other blog of the rain droplets on the leaves.

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  7. What terrific captures of such a gorgeous old tree! And how wonderful that it is being protected!! It always lifts my spirits and my hopes for our world when I read things like this!! Thanks for sharing, Penelope!!

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  8. Great idea!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  9. I've never seen a tree with so many trunks. It's a wonder it wasn't pruned of some of them through the years. Is it my imagination or does it have a lean toward the street? And amazingly enough we stayed overnight in Surrey last May on our way to Jasper. I was surprised by how flat it was there.

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  10. I sooo approve of heritage trees. This tree appears to be in good health. A neighbour of mine had to cut an old horse chestnut tree down last year - it was hollow, or nearly so. It was sad to see it go.

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  11. Heritage trees make me happy!

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  12. Great shots of one of nature's treasures ~ Wow~ (A Creative Harbor)

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  13. Magnificent tree. I love the idea of it being a heritage tree. We grew up with horse chestnuts lining our street in Kelowna, and we made everything from jewelry to weapons with the nuts. Very much a part of our heritage. Now I wonder if Julia and Jonathan know about this big tree in Ocean Park, and if they ever gather the chestnuts.
    Talk to you soon.
    Luv, K


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  14. A lovely post about a beautiful tree...so glad we have learned to treasure these jewels. I have a huge Chestnut tree in my yard, and though I no longer play 'conkers', I do enjoy gathering up the smooth brown chestnuts with the neighbourhood kids...:)

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  15. Not many things are lovelier than a tree with the branches outstretching to the sky and the beautiful foliage, as your photos show. One of my memorable trees is a cherry tree my parents planted on my arrival to this world. It stood proudly in the center of the garden and I would play around or climbed the tree with my siblings.

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  16. Such beautiful photos! I love this post...and the tree! xx

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